ADVERTISEMENT
CURRENT ISSUE
JUNE 2016
KINDLE EDITION



SEARCH JOURNAL ARCHIVES


SEARCH PUBMED


MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS


SUBSCRIBE TO SLEEP

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION


ADVERTISE WITH US


ABOUT SLEEP

ABSTRACT SUPPLEMENTS


ACCEPTED PAPERS
Bookmark and Share         RSS Feed

VOLUME 38, ISSUE 06

RACIAL/ETHNIC DIFFERENCES IN SLEEP DISTURBANCES
Racial/Ethnic Differences in Sleep Disturbances: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.4732

Xiaoli Chen, MD, PhD, MPH1; Rui Wang, PhD2; Phyllis Zee, MD, PhD3; Pamela L. Lutsey, PhD, MPH4; Sogol Javaheri, MD2; Carmela Alcántara, PhD5; Chandra L. Jackson, PhD, MS6; Michelle A. Williams, ScD1; Susan Redline, MD, MPH2

1Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; 2Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Brigham and Women's Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical School, Boston, MA; 3Department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; 4Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; 5Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; 6Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA



  Expand  Table of Contents    
Text size:  

Objectives:

There is limited research on racial/ethnic variation in sleep disturbances. This study aimed to quantify the distributions of objectively measured sleep disordered breathing (SDB), short sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and self-reported sleep disturbances (e.g., insomnia) across racial/ethnic groups.

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Setting:

Six US communities.

Participants:

Racially/ethnically diverse men and women aged 54–93 y in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Sleep Cohort (n = 2,230).

Interventions:

N/A.

Measurements and Results:

Information from polysomnography-measured SDB, actigraphy-measured sleep duration and quality, and self-reported daytime sleepiness were obtained between 2010 and 2013. Overall, 15.0% of individuals had severe SDB (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 30); 30.9% short sleep duration (< 6 h); 6.5% poor sleep quality (sleep efficiency < 85%); and 13.9% had daytime sleepiness. Compared with Whites, Blacks had higher odds of sleep apnea syndrome (AHI ≥ 5 plus sleepiness) (sex-, age-, and study site-adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20, 2.63), short sleep (OR = 4.95, 95% CI: 3.56, 6.90), poor sleep quality (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.00, 2.48), and daytime sleepiness (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.38, 2.60). Hispanics and Chinese had higher odds of SDB and short sleep than Whites. Among non-obese individuals, Chinese had the highest odds of SDB compared to Whites. Only 7.4% to 16.2% of individuals with an AHI ≥ 15 reported a prior diagnosis of sleep apnea.

Conclusions:

Sleep disturbances are prevalent among middle-aged and older adults, and vary by race/ethnicity, sex, and obesity status. The high prevalence of sleep disturbances and undiagnosed sleep apnea among racial/ethnic minorities may contribute to health disparities.

Citation:

Chen X, Wang R, Zee P, Lutsey PL, Javaheri S, Alcántara C, Jackson CL, Williams MA, Redline S. Racial/ethnic differences in sleep disturbances: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). SLEEP 2015;38(6):877–888.

Expand  Table of Contents
ADVERTISEMENT
Classifieds View SLEEP 2011 Poster Presentations Online