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VOLUME 37, ISSUE 06

EVALUATION OF A SLEEP EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES
Evaluation of a Sleep Education Program for Low-Income Preschool Children and Their Families

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.3774

Katherine E. Wilson, MD, MS1; Alison L. Miller, PhD2,3; Karen Bonuck, PhD4; Julie C. Lumeng, MD2,5; Ronald D. Chervin, MD, MS1

1Sleep Disorders Center and Department of Neurology; 2Center for Human Growth and Development; 3Department of Health Education and Health Behavior, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 4Department of Family and Social Medicine and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; 5Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI



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Study Objectives:

To evaluate a novel sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families.

Design:

Randomized trial of an educational intervention.

Setting:

Community-based.

Participants:

Head Start preschool families (n = 152) in greater Lansing and Detroit, Michigan.

Interventions:

Classrooms or Head Start sites were randomized to an intervention group (prompt intervention) versus a control group (delayed intervention). Parents attended a one-time, 45-min sleep education program and preschoolers received 2 w (320 total min) of classroom sleep curriculum.

Measurements:

Parent knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and beliefs were assessed as the primary outcomes just before the 45-min sleep intervention, immediately postintervention, and approximately 1 mo postintervention. Parents reported their child's bedtimes and wake times on 7-day sleep diaries at baseline and at 1-mo follow-up. Average weeknight sleep durations and bedtimes served as secondary outcomes.

Results:

Linear mixed models showed a time × treatment effect for parents' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy (each P < 0.05) but not beliefs. These improvements were found immediately postintervention but were not retained at 1-mo follow-up. Children in the intervention group improved their weeknight sleep duration at 1-mo follow-up by 30 min (11.0 ± 0.9 h vs. 10.5 ± 1.0 hours at baseline) compared to controls (10.4 ± 0.9 h versus 10.5 ± 0.9 h at baseline) (P = 0.04 for difference between groups). Children did not show statistically significant improvements in bedtime.

Conclusions:

Educational interventions in early childhood can have an effect on parents' sleep knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy, and on children's sleep behavior. However, repeated exposure to the new information may be important for parents as well as their children.

Citation:

Wilson KE, Miller AL, Bonuck K, Lumeng JC, Chervin RD. Evaluation of a sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1117-1125.

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