ADVERTISEMENT
CURRENT ISSUE
OCTOBER 2014
KINDLE EDITION



SEARCH JOURNAL ARCHIVES


SEARCH PUBMED


MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS


SUBSCRIBE TO SLEEP

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION


ADVERTISE WITH US


ABOUT SLEEP

ABSTRACT SUPPLEMENTS


ACCEPTED PAPERS
Bookmark and Share         RSS Feed

VOLUME 36, ISSUE 11

SNORING, SLEEPINESS, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN THE HEALTH ABC STUDY
Snoring, Daytime Sleepiness, and Incident Cardiovascular Disease in The Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.3140

Yohannes Endeshaw, MD, MPH1; Thomas B. Rice, MD, MS2; Ann V. Schwartz, PhD, MPH3; Katie L. Stone, PhD4; Todd M. Manini, PhD5; Suzanne Satterfield, MD, DrPH6; Steven Cummings, MD4; Tamara Harris, MD, MS7; Marco Pahor, MD5

1Department of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA; 2University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA; 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco CA; 4Research Institute, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA; 5Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 6Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN; 7Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD



  Expand  Table of Contents    
Text size:  

Objectives:

To examine the association between snoring and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Design, Settings, and Participants:

This is a prospective study in which community dwelling older adults were evaluated at baseline, and followed up for an average of 9.9 years.

Measurements:

Data on snoring, daytime sleepiness, as well as demographic and clinical characteristics of study participants was collected at baseline, and participants were followed up every six months for an average of 9.9 years. Based on snoring and sleepiness status, 4 groups of participants were created: (1) No Snoring, No Sleepiness; (2) No Snoring, Sleepiness; (3) Snoring, No Sleepiness; (4) Snoring, Sleepiness. Incident CVD was defined as a diagnosis of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, or congestive heart failure that resulted in overnight hospitalization during the follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard was used to estimate the risk of incident cardiovascular disease during follow-up by baseline snoring and sleepiness status.

Results:

A total of 2,320 participants with a mean age of 73.6 (2.9) years at baseline were included in the analysis. Fifty-two percent were women, and 58% were white. A total of 543 participants developed CVD events during the follow-up period. Participants who reported snoring associated with daytime sleepiness had significantly increased hazard ratio for CVD events (HR = 1.46 [1.03-2.08], P = 0.035) after adjusting for demographic and clinical confounding factors.

Conclusion:

The results suggest that self-reported snoring and daytime sleepiness status are associated with an increased risk of future cardiovascular disease among older adults.

Citation:

Endeshaw Y; Rice TB; Schwartz AV; Stone KL; Manini TM; Satterfield S; Cummings S; Harris T; Pahor M; for the Health ABC Study. Snoring, daytime sleepiness, and incident cardiovascular disease in the health, aging, and body composition study. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1737-1745.

Expand  Table of Contents
ADVERTISEMENT
Classifieds View SLEEP 2011 Poster Presentations Online