ADVERTISEMENT
CURRENT ISSUE
SEPTEMBER 2016
KINDLE EDITION



SEARCH JOURNAL ARCHIVES


SEARCH PUBMED


MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS


SUBSCRIBE TO SLEEP

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION


ADVERTISE WITH US


ABOUT SLEEP

ABSTRACT SUPPLEMENTS


ACCEPTED PAPERS
Bookmark and Share         RSS Feed

VOLUME 36, ISSUE 07

ACUTE SLEEP RESTRICTION REDUCES INSULIN SENSITIVITY IN ADOLESCENT BOYS
Acute Sleep Restriction Reduces Insulin Sensitivity in Adolescent Boys

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.2816

Lars Klingenberg, MSc1; Jean-Philippe Chaput, PhD2; Ulf Holmbäck, PhD3; Trine Visby, MSc4; Poul Jennum, PhD, MD5; Miki Nikolic, PhD5; Arne Astrup, PhD, MD1; Anders Sjödin, PhD, MD1

1Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada; 3Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; 4MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 5Center for Sleep Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark



  Expand  Table of Contents    
Text size:  

Background:

Short sleep duration has been linked to impaired glucose metabolism in many experimental studies. Moreover, studies have reported indications of an increased metabolic stress following sleep restriction.

Objective:

We aimed to investigate the effects of partial sleep deprivation on markers of glucose metabolism. Additionally, we aimed to investigate if short sleep duration induces a state of endocrine stress.

Design:

A randomized crossover design, with 2 experimental conditions: 3 consecutive nights of short sleep (SS, 4 h/night) and long sleep (LS, 9 h/night) duration.

Subjects and Measurements:

In 21 healthy, normal-weight male adolescents (mean ± SD age: 16.8 ± 1.3 y) we measured pre- and post-prandial glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon concentrations. Furthermore, we measured fasting cortisol, 24-h catecholamines, and sympathovagal balance.

Results:

Fasting insulin was 59% higher (P = 0.001) in the SS than the LS condition as was both fasting (24%, P < 0.001) and post-prandial (11%, P = 0.018) C-peptide. Pre- and post-prandial glucose and glucagon were unchanged between conditions. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index was 65% higher (P = 0.002) and the Matsuda index was 28% lower (P = 0.007) in the SS condition compared to the LS condition. The awakening cortisol response and 24-h norepinephrine were not affected by sleep duration, whereas 24-h epinephrine was 24% lower (P = 0.013) in the SS condition. Neither daytime nor 24-h sympathovagal balance differed between sleep conditions. Short wave sleep was preserved in the SS condition.

Conclusion:

Short-term sleep restriction is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity in healthy normal-weight adolescent boys. There were no indications of endocrine stress beyond this.

Citation:

Klingenberg L; Chaput JP; Holmbäck U; Visby T; Jennum P; Nikolic M; Astrup A; Sjödin A. Acute Sleep Restriction Reduces Insulin Sensitivity in Adolescent Boys. SLEEP 2013;36(7):1085-1090.

Expand  Table of Contents
ADVERTISEMENT
Classifieds View SLEEP 2011 Poster Presentations Online