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VOLUME 36, ISSUE 05

ALTERED RESTING-STATE BRAIN ACTIVITY IN OSA
Altered Resting-State Brain Activity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.2620

Quan Zhang, MD1,2; Dawei Wang, MD1; Wen Qin, MD1; Qiong Li, MD3; Baoyuan Chen, MD4; Yunting Zhang, MD1; Chunshui Yu, MD1

1Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China; 2Department of Radiology, Pingjin Hospital, Logistics University of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, Tianjin, China; 3Department of Radiology, Tianjin Nankai Hospital, Tianjin, China; 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China



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Study Objectives:

Structural and functional brain changes may contribute to neural dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the effect of OSA on resting-state brain activity has not been established. The objective of this study was to investigate alterations in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the common brain networks in patients with OSA and their relationships with changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the corresponding brain regions.

Designs:

Resting-state functional and structural MRI data were acquired from patients with OSA and healthy controls. Seven brain networks were identified by independent component analysis. The rsFC in each network was compared between groups and the GMV of brain regions with significant differences in rsFC was also compared.

Setting:

University hospital.

Patients and Participants:

Twenty-four male patients with untreated OSA and 21 matched healthy controls.

Interventions:

N/A.

Measurements and Results:

OSA specifically affected the cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks but not the visual and auditory networks. The medial prefrontal cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed decreased rsFC and GMV in patients with OSA, suggesting structural and functional deficits. The right DLPFC and left precentral gyrus showed decreased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting a functional deficit. The right posterior cingulate cortex demonstrated increased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting functional compensation. In patients with OSA, the rsFC of the right DLPFC was negatively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index.

Conclusions:

OSA specifically affects resting-state functional connectivity in cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks, which may be related to the impaired cognitive and motor functions in these patients.

Citation:

Zhang Q; Wang D; Qin W; Li Q; Chen B; Zhang Y; Yu C. Altered resting-state brain activity in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2013;36(5):651-659.

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