ADVERTISEMENT
CURRENT ISSUE
AUGUST 2014
KINDLE EDITION



SEARCH JOURNAL ARCHIVES


SEARCH PUBMED


MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS


SUBSCRIBE TO SLEEP

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION


ADVERTISE WITH US


ABOUT SLEEP

ABSTRACT SUPPLEMENTS


ACCEPTED PAPERS
Bookmark and Share         RSS Feed

VOLUME 36, ISSUE 02

SLEEP SPINDLE ACTIVITY AND COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN HEALTHY CHILDREN
Sleep Spindle Activity and Cognitive Performance in Healthy Children

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.2380

Alex Chatburn, BA (Hons) (Psych)1; Scott Coussens, BSci (Hons)1; Kurt Lushington, PhD2; Declan Kennedy, MD1,3; Mathias Baumert, PhD4; Mark Kohler, PhD2,3

1Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Women's and Children's Hospital, North Adelaide, Australia; 2School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; 3Childrens Research Centre and; 4School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia



  Expand  Table of Contents    
Text size:  

Study Objectives:

To investigate the association between indices of sleep spindle activity and cognitive performance in a sample of healthy children.

Design:

Correlational. Intelligence (Stanford-Binet) and neurocognitive functioning (NEPSY) were assessed, with sleep variables being measured during overnight polysomnography.

Setting:

Hospital sleep laboratory.

Participants:

Twenty-seven healthy children (mean age 8.19 y; 14 female, 13 male).

Interventions:

N/A.

Measurements and Results:

Participants underwent a single night of overnight polysomnography after completing measures of intelligence and neurocognitive functioning. Sleep spindles were visually identified by an experienced sleep scoring technician and separated algorithmically into fast (> 13 Hz) and slow spindle (< 13 Hz) categories. The number of fast spindles was significantly correlated with narrative memory (rs = 0.38) and sensorimotor functioning (−0.43). Mean central frequency of spindles was also significantly correlated with sensorimotor functioning (−0.41), planning ability (−0.41), and working memory (−0.54).

Conclusions:

Basal sleep spindle activity is associated with different aspects of cognitive performance in children. To the extent that these associations in a pediatric population are different from what is known in adult sleep may play an important role in development.

Citation:

Chatburn A; Coussens S; Lushington K; Kennedy D; Baumert M; Kohler M. Sleep spindle activity and cognitive performance in healthy children. SLEEP 2013;36(2):237–243.

Expand  Table of Contents
ADVERTISEMENT
Classifieds View SLEEP 2011 Poster Presentations Online