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VOLUME 34, ISSUE 10

SLEEP HABITS, ACTIVITY PATTERNS AND WEIGHT STATUS
Sleep Duration or Bedtime? Exploring the Relationship between Sleep Habits and Weight Status and Activity Patterns

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.1266

Tim S. Olds, PhD1,2; Carol A. Maher, PhD1,2; Lisa Matricciani, BA2

1Health and Use of Time (HUT) Group, Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia



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Study Objectives:

To assess the effects of early and late bedtimes and wake up times on use of time and weight status in Australian school-aged children.

Design:

Observational cross-sectional study involving use of time interviews and pedometers.

Setting:

Free-living Australian adolescents.

Participants:

2200 9- to 16-year-olds from all states of Australia

Interventions:

NA.

Measurements and Results:

Bedtimes and wake times were adjusted for age and sex and classified as early or late using median splits. Adolescents were allocated into 4 sleep-wake pattern groups: Early-bed/Early-rise; Early-bed/Late-rise; Late-bed/Early-rise; Late-bed/Late-rise. The groups were compared for use of time (screen time, physical activity, and study-related time), sociodemographic characteristics, and weight status. Adolescents in the Late-bed/Late-rise category experienced 48 min/d more screen time and 27 min less moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (P < 0.0001) than adolescents in the Early-bed/Early-rise category, in spite of similar sleep durations. Late-bed/Late-rise adolescents had a higher BMI z-score (0.66 vs. 0.45, P = 0.0015). Late-bed/Late-rise adolescents were 1.47 times more likely to be overweight or obese than Early-bed/Early-rise adolescents, 2.16 times more likely to be obese, 1.77 times more likely to have low MVPA, and 2.92 times more likely to have high screen time. Late-bed/Late-rise adolescents were more likely to come from poorer households, to live in major cities, and have fewer siblings.

Conclusions:

Late bedtimes and late wake up times are associated with an unfavorable activity and weight status profile, independent of age, sex, household income, geographical remoteness, and sleep duration.

Citation:

Olds TS; Maher CA; Matricciani L. Sleep duration or bedtime? Exploring the relationship between sleep habits and weight status and activity patterns. SLEEP 2011;34(10):1299-1307.

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