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VOLUME 34, ISSUE 09

SHORT SLEEP, BODY WEIGHT AND PROBLEMS IN CHILDREN
Longitudinal Association between Short Sleep, Body Weight, and Emotional and Learning Problems in Hispanic and Caucasian Children

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.1238

Graciela E. Silva, PhD, MPH1; James L. Goodwin, PhD2,3,5; Sairam Parthasarathy, MD3,4; Duane L. Sherrill, PhD5; Kimberly D. Vana, MS, FNP-BC1; Amy A. Drescher, PhD, RD2; Stuart F. Quan, MD2,3,6

1College of Nursing & Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; 2Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 3College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 4Southern Arizona VA Health Care System and Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 5Mel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 6Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA



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Study Objective:

To determine the impact of lower amounts of childhood sleep assessed by polysomnogram on development of obesity, being anxious or depressed, or having learning problems 5 years later.

Design:

Prospective cohort.

Participants:

Subjects were 304 community participants from the Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study, aged 6–12 years old at baseline.

Measurements and Results:

Children were classified according to baseline sleep as those who slept ≥ 9 h/night, those who slept > 7.5 to < 9 h/night, and those who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night. Odds of overweight/obese (≥ 85th BMI percentile), obese (≥ 95th BMI percentile), anxious or depressed, and learning problems at follow-up were assessed according to baseline sleep categories. Children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night had higher odds of being obese (OR = 3.3, P < 0.05) at follow-up than children who slept ≥ 9 h/night. Borderline significance for overweight/obese (OR = 2.2, P < 0.1), anxious or depressed (OR = 3.3, P < 0.1), and having learning problems (OR = 11.1, P < 0.1) were seen for children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night as compared to those who slept ≥ 9 h/night. A mean increase in BMI of 1.7 kg/m2 (P = 0.01) over the 5 years of follow-up was seen for children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night compared to those who slept ≥ 9 h/night. These relationships did not differ between Hispanic and Caucasian children.

Conclusions:

Children with reduced amounts of sleep (≤ 7.5 h/night) had an increased risk for higher body weight in early adolescence. Similarly, children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night had higher risk of being anxious or depressed or having learning problems in early adolescence.

Citation:

Silva GE; Goodwin JL; Parthasarathy S; Sherrill DL; Vana KD; Drescher AA; Quan SF. Longitudinal association between short sleep, body weight, and emotional and learning problems in Hispanic and Caucasian children. SLEEP 2011;34(9):1197-1205.

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