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VOLUME 34, ISSUE 08

MOBILE PHONE USE AND SLEEP DISTURBANCES IN ADOLESCENTS
The Association between Use of Mobile Phones after Lights Out and Sleep Disturbances among Japanese Adolescents: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey

http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.1152

Takeshi Munezawa, PhD1; Yoshitaka Kaneita, MD1; Yoneatsu Osaki, MD2; Hideyuki Kanda, MD3; Masumi Minowa, MD4; Kenji Suzuki, MD5; Susumu Higuchi, MD6; Junichiro Mori, MD7; Ryuichiro Yamamoto, PhD1,8; Takashi Ohida, MD1

1Division of Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Division of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago, Japan; 3Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan; 4Faculty of Humanities, Seitoku University, Matsudo, Japan; 5Suzuki Mental Clinic, Japan; 6National Hospital Organization Kurihama Alcoholism Center, Kanagawa, Japan; 7Department of Aging Medicine and Geriatrics, Institute on Aging and Adaptation, Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagano, Japan; 8Division of Clinical Psychology, Health Care and Special Support, Graduate School of Education, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata, Japan



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Study Objective:

The objective of this study was to examine the association between the use of mobile phones after lights out and sleep disturbances among Japanese adolescents.

Design and Setting:

This study was designed as a cross-sectional survey. The targets were students attending junior and senior high schools throughout Japan. Sample schools were selected by cluster sampling. Self-reported anonymous questionnaires were sent to schools for all students to fill out.

Participants:

A total of 95,680 adolescents responded. The overall response rate was 62.9%, and 94,777 questionnaires were subjected to analysis.

Intervention:

N/A

Measurements and Results:

Daily mobile phone use, even if only for a brief moment every day, was reported by 84.4%. Moreover, as for use of mobile phones after lights out, 8.3% reported using their mobile phone for calling every day and 17.6% reported using it for sending text messages every day. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that mobile phone use for calling and for sending text messages after lights out was associated with sleep disturbances (short sleep duration, subjective poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, and insomnia symptoms) independent of covariates and independent of each other.

Conclusion:

This study showed that the use of mobile phones for calling and for sending text messages after lights out is associated with sleep disturbances among Japanese adolescents. However, there were some limitations, such as small effect sizes, in this study. More studies that examine the details of this association are necessary to establish strategies for sleep hygiene in the future.

Citation:

Munezawa T; Kaneita Y; Osaki Y; Kanda H; Minowa M; Suzuki K; Higuchi S; Mori J; Yamamoto R; Ohida T. The association between use of mobile phones after lights out and sleep disturbances among Japanese adolescents: a nationwide cross-sectional survey. SLEEP 2011;34(8):1013-1020.

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