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VOLUME 34, ISSUE 05

SLEEP DURATION AND MEMORY IMPAIRMENT IN OLDER CHINESE
Short or Long Sleep Duration Is Associated with Memory Impairment in Older Chinese: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

Lin Xu, MPH1; Chao Qiang Jiang, MD2; Tai Hing Lam, MD1; Bin Liu, Master of Medicine2; Ya Li Jin, Master of epidemiology2; Tong Zhu, Master of Medicine2; Wei Sen Zhang, PhD2; Kar Keung Cheng, PhD3; G. Neil Thomas, PhD3

1Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 2Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital, Guangzhou, China; 3Public Health, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK



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Study Objectives:

To examine the association between sleep-related factors and memory impairment.

Design:

Cross-sectional study

Setting:

Community-based study in Guangzhou, China.

Participants:

28,670 older Chinese (20,776 women and 7,894 men) aged 50 to 85 years.

Measurements and Results:

Demographic and socioeconomic data, sleep-related factors, and cognitive function were collected by face-to-face interview. Potential confounders, such as employment and occupational status, smoking, alcohol and tea use, physical activity, self-rated health, anthropometry, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose and lipids were measured. After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and delayed word recall test (DWRT) score, a validated measure of memory impairment, was found, with 7 to 8 h of habitual sleep duration showing the highest score (P-values for trend from 3 to 7 h and from 7 to ≥ 10 h were all ≤ 0.001). Compared to sleep duration of 7 h, the adjusted odds ratio for memory impairment from the sleep duration of 3 to 4 or ≥ 10 h was 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.07-1.56) and 1.52 (1.25-1.86), respectively. Subjects with daily napping, morning tiredness, or insomnia had significantly lower DWRT scores than those without (P ranged from < 0.001 to 0.01).

Conclusions:

Short or long sleep duration was an important sleep-related factor independently associated with memory impairment and may be a useful marker for increased risk of cognitive impairment in older people.

Citation:

Xu L; Jiang CQ; Lam TH; Liu B; Jin YL; Zhu T; Zhang WS; Cheng KK; Thomas GN. Short or long sleep duration is associated with memory impairment in older Chinese: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. SLEEP 2011;34(5):575-580.

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