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VOLUME 34, ISSUE 03

IMPACT OF SLEEP RESTRICTION ON CHILDREN WITH ADHD
Impact of Sleep Restriction on Neurobehavioral Functioning of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Reut Gruber, PhD1,2; Sabrina Wiebe, MSc1,2; Lisa Montecalvo1,2; Bianca Brunetti1,2; Rhonda Amsel, PhD1; Julie Carrier, PhD3,4

1McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 2Attention, Behavior and Sleep Lab, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Quebec, Canada; 3Centre du Sommeil et des Rythmes Biologiques, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 4Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada



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Study Objectives:

The objective of this study was to assess the cumulative impact of 1 hour of nightly sleep restriction over the course of 6 nights on the neurobehavioral functioning (NBF) of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and healthy controls.

Design:

Following 6 nights of actigraphic monitoring of sleep to determine baseline sleep duration, children were asked to restrict sleep duration by 1 hour for 6 consecutive nights. NBF was assessed at baseline (Day 6) and following sleep manipulation (Day 12).

Setting:

A quiet location within their home environments.

Participants:

Forty-three children (11 ADHD, 32 Controls, mean age = 8.7 years, SD = 1.3) between the ages of 7 and 11 years.

Interventions:

NA

Measurements:

Sleep was monitored using actigraphy. In addition, parents were asked to complete nightly sleep logs. Sleepiness was evaluated using a questionnaire. The Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT) was used to assess NBF.

Results:

Restricted sleep led to poorer CPT scores on two-thirds of CPT outcome measures in both healthy controls and children with ADHD. The performance of children with ADHD following sleep restriction deteriorated from subclinical levels to the clinical range of inattention on two-thirds of CPT outcome measures.

Conclusions:

Moderate sleep restriction leads to a detectable negative impact on the NBF of children with ADHD and healthy controls, leading to a clinical level of impairment in children with ADHD.

Citation:

Gruber R; Wiebe S; Montecalvo L; Brunetti B; Amsel R; Carrier J. Impact of sleep restriction on neurobehavioral functioning of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. SLEEP 2011;34(3):315-323.

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