ADVERTISEMENT
CURRENT ISSUE
APRIL 2014
KINDLE EDITION


SLEEP Seeking New Editor

The APSS is seeking qualified candidates for editor-in-chief of SLEEP



SEARCH JOURNAL ARCHIVES


SEARCH PUBMED


MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS


SUBSCRIBE TO SLEEP

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION


ADVERTISE WITH US


ABOUT SLEEP

ABSTRACT SUPPLEMENTS


ACCEPTED PAPERS
Bookmark and Share         RSS Feed

VOLUME 33, ISSUE 11

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE BRIEF INSOMNIA QUESTIONNAIRE
Reliability and Validity of the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire in the America Insomnia Survey

Ronald C. Kessler, PhD1; Catherine Coulouvrat, MD2; Goeran Hajak, MD3; Matthew D. Lakoma, MPH1; Thomas Roth, PhD4; Nancy Sampson, BA1; Victoria Shahly, PhD1; Alicia Shillington, PhD5; Judith J. Stephenson, SM6; James K. Walsh, PhD7; Gary K. Zammit, PhD8

1Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ; 2Sanofi-Aventis, Paris, France ; 3Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Regensburg, Germany ; 4Sleep Disorders and Research Center, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI ; 5Epi-Q, Inc., Oak Brook, IL ; 6HealthCore, Inc., Wilmington, DE ; 7Sleep Medicine and Research Center, St. Luke's Hospital, St. Louis, MO ; 8Clinilabs, Inc., and Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY



  Expand  Table of Contents    
Text size:  

Study Objectives:

To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire (BIQ), a fully structured questionnaire developed to diagnose insomnia according to hierarchy-free Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10), and research diagnostic criteria/International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2 (RDC/ICSD-2) general criteria without organic exclusions in the America Insomnia Survey (AIS).

Design:

Probability subsamples of AIS respondents, oversampling BIQ positives, completed short-term test-retest interviews (n = 59) or clinical reappraisal interviews (n = 203) to assess BIQ reliability and validity.

Setting:

The AIS is a large (n = 10,094) epidemiologic survey of the prevalence and correlates of insomnia.

Participants:

Adult subscribers to a national managed healthcare plan.

Intervention:

None

Measurements and Results:

BIQ test-retest correlations were 0.47-0.94 for nature of the sleep problems (initiation, maintenance, nonrestorative sleep [NRS]), 0.72-0.95 for problem frequency, 0.66-0.88 for daytime impairment/distress, and 0.62 for duration of sleep. Good individual-level concordance was found between BIQ diagnoses and diagnoses based on expert interviews for meeting hierarchy-free inclusion criteria for diagnoses in any of the diagnostic systems, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, a measure of classification accuracy insensitive to disorder prevalence) of 0.86 for dichotomous classifications. The AUC increased to 0.94 when symptom-level data were added to generate continuous predicted-probability of diagnosis measures. The AUC was lower for dichotomous classifications based on RDC/ICSD-2 (0.68) and ICD-10 (0.70) than for DSM-IV-TR (0.83) criteria but increased consistently when symptom-level data were added to generate continuous predicted-probability measures of RDC/ICSD-2, ICD-10, and DSM-IV-TR diagnoses (0.92-0.95).

Conclusions:

These results show that the BIQ generates accurate estimates of the prevalence and correlates of hierarchy-free insomnia in the America Insomnia Survey.

Citation:

Kessler RC; Coulouvrat C; Hajak G; Lakoma MD; Roth T; Sampson N; Shahly V; Shillington A; Stephenson JJ; Walsh JK; Zammit GK. Reliability and validity of the brief insomnia questionnaire in the america insomnia survey. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1539-1549.

Expand  Table of Contents
ADVERTISEMENT
Classifieds View SLEEP 2011 Poster Presentations Online