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VOLUME 33, ISSUE 05

SLEEP PROBLEMS AND WORKPLACE INJURIES
Sleep Problems and Workplace Injuries in Canada

Rakel N. Kling, MSc1; Christopher B. McLeod, PhD1,2,3; Mieke Koehoorn, PhD1,2

1Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, 2School of Public and Population Health, 3College for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada



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Study Objective: To investigate the association between sleep problems and risk of work injuries among Canadian workers and to identify working groups most at risk for injuries.
Design: Population-based cross-sectional survey.
Setting: Canada
Participants: Working-age respondents (15-64 years of age) who worked part or full-time in the last 12 months (n = 69,584).
Interventions: None
Methods: This study used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Cycle 1.1 2000-2001.
Measurements and Results: The main indicator of sleep problems was reporting trouble going to sleep or staying asleep. Stratified logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of sleep problems and work injury after adjusting for potential confounders and for the survey design. Trouble sleeping most of the time was significantly associated with work injury in both men (OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.01-1.55) and women (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.25-1.91). The multivariate stratified analysis found that men in trades and transportation jobs (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.09-2.08), women in processing and manufacturing jobs (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.11-5.47), and women who work rotating shifts (OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.11-2.64) were at the highest increased risk for work injury associated with trouble sleeping.
Conclusions: Trouble sleeping was associated with an increased risk of work injury. The number of injuries attributable to sleep problems was higher for women compared to men. While most job classes and shift types showed an increased risk of injury, some groups such as women in processing and manufacturing and those who work rotating shifts warrant further investigation and attention for intervention.
Keywords: Sleep problems, sleep, workers, injury, occupational health, Canada, risk

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