ADVERTISEMENT
CURRENT ISSUE
JULY 2014
KINDLE EDITION



SEARCH JOURNAL ARCHIVES


SEARCH PUBMED


MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS


SUBSCRIBE TO SLEEP

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION


ADVERTISE WITH US


ABOUT SLEEP

ABSTRACT SUPPLEMENTS


ACCEPTED PAPERS
Bookmark and Share         RSS Feed

VOLUME 33, ISSUE 05

SLEEP AND HEALTH IN VERY OLD CHINESE
Sociodemographic and Health Correlates of Sleep Quality and Duration among Very Old Chinese

Danan Gu, PhD1; Jessica Sautter, MA2; Robin Pipkin, BA3; Yi Zeng, PhD4,5

1Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University, Portland, OR; 2Department of Sociology, Duke University, Durham, NC; 3School of Community Health, Portland State University, Portland, OR; 4Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University, Durham, NC; 5Center for Healthy Aging and Family Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China



  Expand  Table of Contents    
Text size:  

Study Objectives: To examine factors associated with self-reported sleep quality and duration among very old adults in China.
Design: Cross-sectional analysis of the 2005 wave of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS).
Setting: In-home interview with older adults in 22 provinces in mainland China.
Participants: A total of 15,638 individuals aged 65 and older (5,047 aged 65-79, 3,870 aged 80-89, 3,927 aged 90-99, and 2,794 aged 100 and older, including 6,688 men and 8,950 women).
Interventions: N/A
Measurements and Results: Two self-reported sleep questions together with numerous sociodemographic and health status measures were used in this study. Sixty-five per cent of Chinese elders reported good quality of sleep. The average number of self-reported hours of sleep was 7.5 (SD 1.9), with 13.1%, 16.2%, 18.0%, 28.0%, 9.2%, and 15.5% reporting ≤ 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and ≥ 10 hours, respectively (weighted). Multivariate analyses showed that male gender, rural residence, Han ethnicity, higher socioeconomic status, and good health conditions were positively associated with good quality of sleep. All other factors being equal, octogenarians, nonagenarians, and centenarians were more likely to have good sleep quality than the young elders aged 65-79. Elders with poorer health status or older age were more likely to have either relatively shorter (≤ 6 h) or longer (≥ 10 h) sleep duration. Married elders were more likely to have an average duration between these two values. Except for some geographic variations, associations between all other factors and sleep duration were weak compared to the effects of health.
Conclusions: Age and health conditions are the two most important factors associated with self-reported sleep quality and duration. Good quality of sleep among long-lived old adults may have some implications for achieving healthy longevity.
Keywords: China, healthy longevity survey, older adults, oldest-old, quality of sleep, sleep duration, sociodemographic factors

Expand  Table of Contents
ADVERTISEMENT
Classifieds View SLEEP 2011 Poster Presentations Online