ADVERTISEMENT
CURRENT ISSUE
NOVEMBER 2014
KINDLE EDITION



SEARCH JOURNAL ARCHIVES


SEARCH PUBMED


MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS


SUBSCRIBE TO SLEEP

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION


ADVERTISE WITH US


ABOUT SLEEP

ABSTRACT SUPPLEMENTS


ACCEPTED PAPERS
Bookmark and Share         RSS Feed

VOLUME 32, ISSUE 04

INSOMNIA AND HYPERTENSION
Insomnia with Objective Short Sleep Duration is Associated with a High Risk for Hypertension

Alexandros N. Vgontzas, MD1; Duanping Liao, PhD2; Edward O. Bixler, PhD1; George P. Chrousos, MD3; Antonio Vela-Bueno, MD4

1Sleep Research and Treatment Center, Department of Psychiatry, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA; 2Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA; 3First Department of Pediatrics and Unit on Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; 4Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Autonomous University, Madrid, Spain



 
Text size:  
Study Objectives: To examine the joint effect of insomnia and objective short sleep duration on hypertension risk.
Design: Representativecross-sectional study.
Setting: Sleep laboratory.
Participants: 1,741 men and womenrandomly selectedfrom central Pennsylvania.
Interventions: None.
Measurements: Insomnia was defined by a complaint of insomnia with a duration ≥ 1 year, while poor sleep was defined as a complaint of difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or early final awakening. Polysomnographic sleep duration was classified into 3 categories: ≥ 6 h sleep (top 50% of the sample); 5-6 h (approximately the third quartile of the sample); and ≤ 5 h (approximately the bottom quartile of the sample). Hypertension was defined based either on blood pressure measures or treatment. We controlled for age, race, sex, body mass index, diabetes, smoking, alcohol use, depression, sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and sampling weight.
Results: Compared to the normal sleeping and > 6 h sleep duration group, the highest risk of hypertension was in insomnia with < 5 h sleep duration group (OR [95% CI] 5.1 [2.2, 11.8]), and the second highest in insomnia who slept 5-6 hours (OR 3.5 [1.6, 7.9] P < 0.01). The risk for hypertension was significantly higher, but of lesser magnitude, in poor sleepers with short sleep duration.
Conclusions: Insomnia with short sleep duration is associated with increased risk of hypertension, to a degree comparable to that of other common sleep disorders, e.g., SDB. Objective sleep duration may predict the severity of chronic insomnia a prevalent condition whose medical impact has been apparently underestimated.
Keywords: Insomnia, objective sleep duration, hypertension
ADVERTISEMENT
Classifieds View SLEEP 2011 Poster Presentations Online